Below is above 2016, oil on Belgian linen
Below is above II 2016, oil on Belgian linen
Projection 2016, watercolour on Arches paper
Projection 2016, watercolour on Arches paper
Braid 2015, oil on marine ply
Star 2015, oil on Belgian linen
Star 2015, oil on marine ply
Star 2015, oil on Belgian linen
Star 2015, oil on marine ply
Double star 2015, oil on marine ply
Strata VI 2014, watercolour on paper
Strata II 2014, oil (alkyd resin) on marine ply
Strata III 2014, oil (alkyd resin) on canvas
Strata V 2014, watercolour on paper
Strata VII 2014, watercolour on paper
Strata IV 2014, oil (alkyd resin) on canvas
Untitled 2012, oil on marine ply
Vault II 2008, automotive enamel on marine ply
Asteroid 2008, oil on canvas on board (alkyd colour)
Flex and fold I 2008, watercolour on paper

A few thoughts on painting: what is an image, really?

Drawing, as Matisse remarked, is simply painting with limited means. When I make an oil painting or a watercolour painting, it is an extension of my drawing.  The term “drawing” is much more interesting than “painting”. The former, in English, also means to pull out: the image is pulled out of the surface. That’s how I think about the practice of image-making: images are pulled out of surfaces. At the same time, an imaginary or illusory space is pushed in to the surface. This process begins as soon as you make a single mark, with the mark in the foreground, floating in a kind of void. So no matter how two dimensional you try to be, your image is always already three dimensional, a projection.

Making paintings is a game

You can play other games: try to make your painting a single colour, for example. But that only reinforces the relationship between the work and its environment: the work itself is a figure against the ground of the wall.

So we’re always playing with projections in visual art. That’s okay. The visual world itself is a projection too, inverted on our retinas. Now we can begin.